cameras
Expert Score
6.3

Panasonic Lumix ZS50 Digital Camera Review

Panasonic's ZS50 travel zoom trades megapixels for low-light prowess

Credit: Reviewed.com / Kyle Looney
March 11, 2015
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In recent years, cameras have been fighting a losing battle. As more and more users elect to use their phones as their on-the-go camera, there are fewer times when a dedicated compact camera makes sense. Camera manufacturers have been combating this trend by packing as much performance as possible into pocketable point-and-shoots, hoping optical zoom will sway buyers. Just over a year ago, Panasonic announced the ZS40, a compact camera with advanced controls and a mighty 30x optical zoom lens to serve that exact purpose.

One year later, Panasonic has announced its newest take on the travel camera with the ZS50 (MSRP $399.99). At first glance, the ZS50 is almost identical to last year's ZS40, with the exception of the redesigned grip. On closer inspection, the ZS50 has a few key changes that separate it from its predecessor. Panasonic has been shrunk the resolution from 18.1MP to 12.1MP, expanded the ISO range, removed the built-in GPS, and increased the resolution in both the EVF (electronic view-finder) and the rear LCD.

While the changes to the ZS50 seem promising, previous ZS-series cameras have come up short of expectations once we put them to the test. This year is different.

Design & Handling

Panasonic got a grip on the ZS series again

The ZS50 continues to carry the same overall feel as previous ZS-cameras aesthetically–small, dark, and handsome. Physically you won't notice a difference in this year's version other than the larger grip. It also retained all the controls necessary for users to have full control of their images.

The layout on top of the ZS50 is completely unchanged, with a mode dial, zoom toggle, power switch, record button, microphones, speaker, and shutter release all reprising their roles. The rear controls are in a standard point-and-shoot layout with a command dial surrounded by playback, display, trash, and a function button. The WiFi button remains under the rear grip, but the LVF button is now further right and doubles as a second customizable function button.

Probably the largest, and most welcome, additions are the changes to the grip and aperture ring. The forward grip on the ZS40 was merely a 1-inch strip of leather, making it next-to-impossible to steady the camera while shooting at longer focal lengths. The ZS50 has gone back to the previous ZS-series grip which is a healthy, curved grip that provides plenty of stabilization for its 30x zoom. The rear thumb grip is also slightly more robust, improving overall handling. In addition to the grip, the front aperture ring is slightly thicker and more tactile than the ZS40, making it easier to change settings on the fly.

Panasonic-Lumix-ZS50-Review-Design-Grip.jpg
Credit: Reviewed.com / Kyle Looney
The grip is more substantial and actually helps when zoomed in.

One advantage that the ZS50 has over the competition is its EVF. While both the rear LCD and EVF have been given resolution bumps, the EVF has been upgraded in a huge way. The LCD has gone from 920k dots to 1,040k dots–a 13% increase in resolution. The ZS40's EVF was only 200k dots whereas the ZS50 is sporting a 1,166k-dot EVF–a whopping 483% higher resolution. The changes make the new EVF a much more attractive framing option for users than it was previously.

Shooting with the ZS50 is simple and straightforward, though it can be a bit slow to focus at long range. We loved the aperture ring on the ZS40 and we love it even more with the extra surface area on the ZS50. You can even customize it, so that it'll control shutter speed, aperture, or creative modes. The new grip also makes framing long range shots easier, though it is still rather shaky once you approach the 15x zoom mark—even with the optical stabilization.

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Performance

Another disappointing ZS camera in the lab

The ZS50 shares many performance features with the ZS40, including a 24-720mm f/3.3-6.4 Leica-branded zoom lens, 1080/60p video, 10 fps burst shooting at full resolution, and a Venus Engine image processor. Since the ZS40 was a dud in the lab, the similarities had us a bit skeptical about how the ZS50 would stack up.

One surprising change is to the sensor, which is the same size as the ZS40’s but has 50% fewer pixels. The benefit there is that the pixels can be about 50% larger, gathering more light. This improves low light image quality, though sometimes at the expense of fine detail.

Lowering the sensor resolution might sound counterintuitive, but it actually can raise the quality of an image. Tweet It

When we tested this, we saw an overall drop in sharpness on the ZS50, but noise levels were lower which often leads to a better looking image. That said, just because it improved over the ZS40 doesn't mean it's good. Most zoom cameras in this class suffer from what is called diffraction limitation. Basically when the lens closes down too far, sharpness suffers regardless of how good the lens is. The ZS50 hits this around the 10x zoom mark, after which image quality diminishes.

Panasonic-ZS50-Zoom.jpg
Credit: Reviewed.com / Kyle Looney
The image above shows the full extent of zooming power that the ZS50 has.

Both color and white balance took a slight dive in accuracy as well. Not that the ZS50 was particularly bad–it was on par with most cameras in its class–but the ZS40 comes out on top when you compare it to almost any point-and-shoot on the market. We aren't sure what Panasonic did differently for white balance on the ZS40, but they should have stuck with it on the ZS50.

Low-light performance is slightly better on the ZS50 thanks to the lower resolution and less aggressive noise reduction. The range extends up to ISO 6400, but we would be hard pressed to recommend floating anywhere above ISO 800. If you look at Rosie below, you'll notice a colossal loss of quality from ISO 1600 and up–with ISO 6400 looking more like an impressionist painting than a photo.

Rosie

Video is in the same boat as the still photos, with muddy details. However, the 1080/60p video is smooth and shows minimum signs of trailing and artifacts. Low-light sensitivity is a bit disappointing as the camera needs at least 15 lux of light to record a usable image, so things like candle-lit birthday parties are bound to suffer. That isn't too surprising given the lens is only f/3.3 when wide open, but it's still worse than its predecessor.

Features

Full of features, but the EVF still separates it from the pack

Last year's ZS40 was truly brimming with features, and this year's ZS50 is no different. The biggest feature is by far the built-in EVF, something no other camera in its category offers. As we mentioned earlier, the ZS50's EVF resolution is a staggering 483% higher than that of the ZS40's. This gives users a huge leg up over other cameras in its class while framing and tracking subjects.

Obviously a 30x zoom packed in such a small package is the main draw with travel cameras. However, the ZS50 also includes built-in WiFi and NFC that allows you to use your smartphone as a remote with the "Panasonic Image App". The app allows you to change settings, focus, and zoom remotely with your phone.

The ZS50 is compatible with the app's new "Jump Shot" mode which allows you to trigger the shutter release on the camera by jumping with your connected phone in your pocket. (You can also just shake your phone for a less dramatic trigger.) Additionally, you can transfer photos from the camera to your phone or even share photos straight to the web.

The ZS50 has a new "Jump Shot" mode which allows you to trigger the shutter release on the camera by jumping with your connected phone in your pocket. Tweet It

Unfortunately, the built-in GPS from the ZS40 wasn't included on the ZS50. The ZS50 does roll out a new Time Lapse Shot feature–previously seen on the Panasonic GM5–which automatically combines a time-lapse series of images into a single MP4-format video at 30 or 60 fps. There are also two high-speed modes of 720/120p and 480/240p.

Panasonic-Lumix-ZS50-Review-Design-Aperture-Ring.jpg
Credit: Reviewed.com / Kyle Looney
The aperture ring is more robust than that of the ZS40.

Creative modes and filters are a must for travel cameras to compete with smartphones. The ZS50 carried over Panasonic's Creative Control filters, which include 15 options ranging from Retro to Dynamic Monochrome to Cross Process. Creative Retouch, which are the same 15 filters as Creative Control, can be used to apply these filters to JPEG photos that have already been taken. There are also 18 scene modes such as Sunset, HDR, and Night Portrait that help entry-level users get the shot they want the first time.

Conclusion

Have zoom, will travel

All in all, the ZS50 is a fun alternative to using your phone. It's portable, packs a whopping 30x zoom, and the controls are balanced enough to be comfortable for new users and enthusiasts alike. Add in the improved EVF, aperture ring, and RAW shooting, and you've got the tools to take much more control over your images.

Panasonic-Lumix-ZS50-Review-Design-Lens1.jpg
Credit: Reviewed.com / Kyle Looney
The ZS50 has a 24-720mm f/3.3-6.4 Leica-branded zoom lens.

The changes made to the sensor did improve image quality slightly, but the camera is still suffering from a small sensor, slow autofocus speeds, soft images, and a small aperture. Unfortunately, the quality is simply not good enough for anything more than small prints and social media. In truth the images aren't much better than we're seeing with current smartphones, leaving the long zoom as the sole benefit.

When comparing the ZS50 to its predecessor it seems to take several step forward, but a couple steps back as well. It improved handling and usability with a far sharper EVF, more robust aperture ring, and more substantial grip. However, it lost the built-in GPS, resolution is down, and both color and white balance performance dipped. In general, though, it's worth the slight premium thanks to that EVF.

Unfortunately, the quality is simply not good enough for anything more than small prints and social media. Tweet It

The real question is: "Does it stack up to the competition?" Performance wise, there are better 30x zoom cameras out–like the Canon PowerShot SX700 and the Sony CyberShot HX50V. However, neither of them have an EVF, aperture ring, or shoot RAW files. These features generally belong to more expensive high-end point-and-shoots, giving the ZS50 a huge advantage.

Panasonic-Lumix-ZS50-Review-Design-EVF.jpg
Credit: Reviewed.com / Kyle Looney
The EVF was improved greatly on the ZS50.

But given that the ZS50 costs around $400 itself, it's really not all that far off from those better cameras. Current models like the Sony RX100 III and Canon G7 X are very pricey, but older high-end cameras like the original Sony RX100 can be found for less money. You won't get the EVF or 30x optical zoom, but you'll get far better images.

If you're looking to stay under $400 and absolutely need the 30x zoom, the ZS50 stands alone. It's expensive for the image quality you get, but that's the price you pay for a product with so few direct competitors.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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