cameras

Panasonic Lumix DMC-G3 Review

The G3 is yet another attempt by Panasonic to bring the Micro to the whole of their Micro Four-Thirds line.

June 16, 2011
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Introduction

Panasonic's G3 is yet another attempt at putting the Micro in Micro Four-Thirds, shrinking another G-series camera down by a significant margin.

Meanwhile, though the frame is shrinking, the goods just keep piling on. The G3 offers a compact metal body, a 16-megapixel CMOS image sensor, an articulated high-resolution rear LCD, a full hot shoe, and an electronic viewfinder. All of this is offered for a decidedly entry-level MSRP of $700, with lens included. When a company pours money into worthwhile updates, it is always our hope that great things will follow, but only a trip to the lab will indicate whether this is the case.

Design & Usability

According to Panasonic, the G3 is the "smallest, lightest compact system camera that features a built-in flash." Whatever the case, the G3's built-in viewfinder means it won't effortlessly slide into your pocket anyway, even with a pancake lens.

Weighing in at less than a pound with an articulated touchscreen LCD, the G3 is an easy camera to work into any number of odd shooting angles. The body feels solidly built and its rounded edges slot comfortably into the hand. The G3 feels the way a sub-$1000 camera should feel: well-crafted and lightweight. This device may not survive a trip to anything that is popularly described as "besieged," but it will weather Disney World without much complaint. We just wish it had more rubber to improve overall grip.

[Panasonic's touch control menu navigation is quite fluid. Tweet It

Panasonic has never been known for their menu designs, but their touch control menu navigation is quite fluid. The G3 is a fairly typical Panasonic offering, with a Record menu, In-Depth Custom menu, and Quick menu setup, the latter of which is accessible by a dedicated button on the rear of the camera—assuming it hasn't been given another custom function, as it shares double duty. The customizable Quick menu allows access to some of the most commonly used features. Nearly all the buttons have a raised profile and satisfying stroke, with seemingly no wasted space. We reserve complaint for the small control dial and flat DISP./Fn1 button, but the rest of the design is very nice.

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Features

Enthusiasts and beginners alike will find things of interest on the Panasonic G3.

Many shooters will turn their noses up at this 460k-dot touchscreen LCD, but Panasonic has utilized it in a way that is so secondary to the operation of the camera that it's easy to just ignore it if that's really what you prefer. The G3 also has two programmable function buttons, a quick menu, and two on-the-dial custom modes, amongst numerous others. Notable hardware also includes a Micro Four Thirds lens system, an improved Live MOS 16-megapixel image sensor, and a 1,440k electronic viewfinder.

Between a full set of scene modes and the aforementioned level of manual authority, most users will not be left wanting. Tweet It

Less experienced shooters will enjoy Panasonic's intelligent auto mode, accessible through a dedicated iA button, and a range of creative tools as well. There are seven photo styles including Vivid, Custom, and Natural, and each mode allows fine adjustments to contrast, sharpness, saturation, and noise reduction on a +/- 2 scale. There's not much in the way of in-camera editing for still images, and even less for video, but between a full set of scene modes and the aforementioned level of manual authority, most users will not be left wanting.

Performance

For an entry-level Micro Four Thirds camera, image quality doesn't get much better than on the G3.

The Panasonic G3 recorded more accurate colors than its competition while increasing maximum image resolution to 16 megapixels. It did so while also managing to keep image noise at acceptable, if not exceptional, levels. In fact, the G3 is practically the best entry-level Micro Four Thirds camera available for image quality right now.

The G3 is practically the best entry-level Micro Four Thirds camera available for image quality right now. Tweet It

Happily, the Micro Four Thirds lens system has come a long way, especially since third party companies like Sigma and Carl Zeiss now produce compatible lenses. For our money, though, the 14-42mm lens kitted with the G3 is not the best available. At apertures larger than f/5.6, there's a fairly substantial sharpness falloff with heavy vignetting. It's a fine lens otherwise, but we'd recommend stopping down to at least f/8 and utilizing any of the excellent prime MFT options available for shallow depth of field work.

The G3 did not offer a substantial improvement in video quality over the G2, however. Any quick panning from side to side will quickly offer a first-hand lesson in the finer points of motion sickness, and controls are lacking.

Conclusion

The Panasonic G3 really went after the entry-level gold.

The G3 represents another step forward for Panasonic's line of Micro Four Thirds cameras. The new sensor design improves some key areas: high ISO performance and resolution.

Undeniably, the G3 simply dwarfs the competition for control options. If you want pro-level control in a compact body, the Panasonic G3 is for you. We'd love to see that level of control for video recording, but for still shooters, the options are phenomenal. Entry-level shooters aren't left without a crutch, though, thanks to a dedicated intelligent auto button.

The G3 also offers more than simply token spec upgrades, improving in nearly every way on the performance of the Panasonic G2. It has a new 16-megapixel sensor that keeps noise to a respectable minimum, excellent color accuracy, and respectable dynamic range of more than 6.5 stops. Altogether, the G3 is a very promising member of the Micro Four-Thirds family, and a very good entry-level camera in its own right.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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