cameras

Fujifilm X-A1 Digital Camera Review

Fuji's new entry-level looks lavish and feels flimsy.

October 14, 2013
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Starting with the X100 in 2010, Fujifilm has hooked shooters with its unparalleled attention to detail, great images, and excellent build quality. Expanding into the burgeoning compact system market, Fuji's X-Pro1 and X-E1 simply felt like the real deal. Finely knurled knobs, metal plates, and sturdy composites brought users back to the bygone era when you might have shot with real Fujifilm… film. Furthermore, the X-mount lens standard has built itself on a stable of excellent prime lenses, cementing the system's reputation.

Alas, Fujifilm is tempting fate with its latest low-end interchangeable entry. Even though the X-A1 (MSRP $599.99) is the most affordable X-mount camera on offer, its dime store build quality leaves a crucial ingredient to Fujifilm's success on the shelf. Image quality is still high, but, the X-A1 isn't the kind of well-made camera we've come to expect from Fujifilm. Reaching downmarket makes a certain amount of sense, but Fujifilm has built its newfound mojo on premium photographic equipment—a standard the X-A1 doesn't live up to.

Design & Handling

Cheap, cheap, cheap

While well-heeled camera enthusiasts can spring for lustworthy Leica gear, not everyone is a gazillionaire. That's where Fujifilm's X-Mount system enters into the equation. The X-Pro1 earned Fuji a reputation as the poor man's Leica—quality, hand-finished cameras with high-grade lenses to match.

Even though the X-A1 looks like a premium camera on the shelf, the illusion is shattered as soon as you pick it up. If you have certain expectations from sexy product shots on the internet, the cheap, mediocre build will leave you deflated. It feels like someone's trying to pull one over on you.

The X-A1's materials are pretty middle-of-the-road, but the control layout is simple and makes sense. There's enough control on the X-A1 to please most users, with only a few niggling issues. We found fault with the cheap-feeling power switch surrounding the shutter button–it's small, needs too much force to move, and feels surprisingly fragile. There's the awkwardly placed vertical control wheel on the back, which is imprecise and difficult to use with either your thumb or forefinger.

Around back, you'll find a non-touch, 920K-dot LCD. Mounted on a sturdy tilting mechanism, the 3-inch panel is bright and handy when shooting at off angles. You won't find a built-in EVF, much less the nifty hybrid EVF/OVF found on the X-Pro1 and X100s. Since Fujifilm has become known for its viewfinders, it would have been nice to see at least the option to add an accessory EVF to the X-A1. This lack of expandability is something we also saw with Sony's entry-level NEX-3N, and it's likely due to cost-cutting. If you need the ability to add an external EVF, the Olympus E-PM2 is a fine alternative that's compatible with two accessory EVFs.

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Features

One feature stands between the X-M1 and X-A1

There's a strong case to be made for the existence of a low-end X-Mount camera like the X-A1. And, this isn't the first attempt Fujifilm has made to push the price down. Just a few months ago, we checked out the X-M1, a camera that is basically identical to the X-A1 but features Fuji's high-end image sensor. By stripping out the pricier X-Trans sensor technology from the X-M1, Fujifilm was able to push the price down another $200—no small difference.

So, you don't get an X-Trans sensor. But you do get everything else the X-M1 offered. Tweet It

X-Trans is a new variety of color filter for CMOS sensors. Instead of a uniform color filter pattern like the bog-standard Bayer technique, the X-Trans array and its less repetitive layout of colors can result in more natural images. The unique layout of the X-Trans sensor is also supposed to prevent false colors and moiré. This does have the side-effect of complicating post-processing; since the technology is exclusive to Fujifilm, third-party software makers often don't support it out of the box and you can end up with mixed results. For this reason, the more conventional Bayer filter APS-C sensor in the X-A1 might be a slight advantage for RAW shooters.

So, you don't get an X-Trans sensor. But you do get everything else the X-M1 offered. Burst shooting, film simulation modes, art filters, automatic scene selection, WiFi…it's all there. Considering its feature set, the X-A1 is well-equipped. You even get advanced features like film simulation bracketing, focus peaking, and adjustments for highlights, shadows, and sharpness.

Of course, this being an X-mount camera, you get access to a catalog of excellent prime lenses. Fujifilm has a sweet lineup of primes, including a range of six focal lengths to suit just about every style: 14mm, 17mm, 18mm, 23mm, 35mm, and 60mm are all already available with a fast 56mm f/1.2 coming early next year. There are a growing number of great zooms, too. The system isn't as large as Micro Four Thirds or even Sony's E-Mount, but there are lenses from a growing number of third party manufacturers, including Zeiss and Samyang.

Performance

This close to the X-M1

Given that the only notable difference between the X-A1 and X-M1 is a different, more conventional sensor, it's no surprise that we found the two cameras performed similarly in lab tests.

The kit option for the X-A1 includes the same 16-50mm f/3.5-5.6 we scoped out with the X-M1. It's a fine lens, albeit with a typically conservative aperture range. It's part of Fujifilm's XC family (that means a plasticky build and no aperture ring), and it's a cheaper alternative to the XF 18-55mm that came with the X-E1, more in line with competing kit lenses.

If you set a custom white balance, you'll find that the X-A1 has spot-on accuracy. We noticed very little deviation between the ideal and what the X-A1 manages on its own—only a few kelvins on average. Auto white balance was a different story, showing average performance under incandescent and florescent lights.

The X-A1's noise reduction software is very aggressive. By default, noise was kept under 2% throughout the entire sensitivity range, obliterating detail in images shot at higher ISOs. However, if you're set on letting the camera control the sensor's sensitivity, you can manually limit the ISO ceiling. To preserve as much detail as possible under normal conditions, plan on shooting at 3200 and below.



Fujifilm continues to fall flat on its face when it comes to video. Tweet It

Fujifilm continues to fall flat on its face when it comes to video. There's only one Full HD option available to users and it cranks out ugly, moiré-filled video. Sharpness was decent enough in both low- and bright- light video testing, but the camera required 18 lux to reach 50 IRE in our minimum illumination test—a disappointing result since competing mirrorless cameras managed to at least score under 15 lux in our test. To make things worse, the X-A1 had great difficulty focusing in dimmer conditions, racking in and out as we recorded footage.

Read about more of our lab tests over on the science page.

Conclusion

The true entry-level X-mount

When we reviewed the X-M1, we concluded that it was a camera with an excellent sensor in a chintzy body. The X-A1 keeps the same cheap suit, drops in a marginally inferior sensor, and charges you $200 less. Is that a good thing? It depends on what you're shopping for.

Right off the bat, we have to say that there are better mirrorless options out there for less money. If you want an APS-C sensor in a compact body, check out Sony's $450 NEX-3N. If you want a compact system camera with a bunch of different lenses and more expandability, an Olympus E-PM2 will get you into Micro Four Thirds for less than $500.

But there's no cheaper way into the X-mount system. If you like prime lenses with premium build quality and sharp optics, few can rival what Fujifilm has done with its portfolio. With the X-A1, you finally have a true entry-level way of getting these gems into your arsenal. Lenses like the XF 35mm f/1.4 and new XF 23mm f/1.4 really show off how special the Fujinon lens system is. Curious owners of other systems who wish to dabble in X-mount glass can rest assured—the X-A1's imaging quality is good enough to properly express the greatness of Fujifilm's lens lineup.

We'd strongly recommend saving up the extra cash and buying into the X-mount system properly with the X-E1 or X-Pro1—even if you have to get one second-hand. Tweet It

That said, we just can't help but feel that Fujifilm has compromised a camera system that was founded on uncompromising quality. The X-A1 feels like it's disposable. X-mount lenses are a bargain compared to similar glass from Canon and Nikon, but you're still looking at spending upwards of a grand to getting the X-A1 plus the prime of your choice. We'd strongly recommend saving up the extra cash and buying into the system properly with the X-E1 or X-Pro1—even if you have to get one second-hand.

Combining the aperture ring on many XF lenses with the shutter speed dial of both top-end X cameras make the classic manual-yet-modern idea come to life in a way that the X-A1 simply can't. This cheapest X consequently feels less soulful and unique, even if the lack of Fujifilm's exclusive X-Trans technology hasn't hurt image quality too badly.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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