Nikon Finally Introduces 10.2-megapixel D200

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

November 1, 2005 - In the wake of constant leaks and rumors, Nikon announced the Nikon D200 today. The D200 replaces the three-year-old Nikon D100, to fill the gap between the popular prosumer D70s and the high-end D2Hs and D2X.

The D200's 10.92 megapixel (10.2 effective) CCD shares four-channel output architecture with the imager in the flagship Nikon D2X, allowing the D200 to use the D2X's image-processing engine. Nikon claims this system boosts speed and quality – the engine does some signal processing before analog-to-digital conversion, and improves performance in the digital side as well, for better fine color gradations. Nikon also touts a new optical low-pass filter for reduced moire and color fringing.

Nikon also seems to be playing some catch-up with Canon on the image parameter front – the D200 offers improved controls for sharpness, tone, color, saturation and hue, and parameter presets including "Normal, Softer, Vivid, More Vivid, Portrait and Black-and-White."

The D200's size and shape are similar to the D100's. Both include pop-up flashes, and lack integrated vertical grips. The D200 is slightly smaller than the D100, at 5.8 x 4.4 x 2.9 inches. The D100 is only 5.7 inches wide, but it is also nearly a quarter-inch taller and deeper than the D200. The D200 is built on a magnesium alloy chassis, tough construction it shares with the D2X and D2Hs. Nikon also claims an "enhanced environmental sealing system," and a shutter tested for 100,000 cycles to indicate the camera's potential durability.

The D200 has a new Nikon autofocus system, dubbed the CAM1000. The new system has 11 sensor sites, and an option to switch to 7 wide-area sensor sites. Both the D100 and the D70s sport the CAM900, with 5 sensor sites, though autofocus performance was improved in the CAM900 with the introduction of the D70s. The D200 does not share the industry-leading Multi-CAM2000 system found in the D2Hs and D2X.

Nikon reports 5 frames-per-second performance in burst mode, capturing up to 22 RAW files or 37 JPEGs at a clip. A startup time of.15 seconds, a 50 millisecond shutter lag and a mirror blackout of 105 milliseconds round out the D200's speed specs. The D70s manages about 3 frames per second. The D200 syncs for electronic flash at 1/250 second, better than the D100's 1/180 speed, but a retreat from the D70s's impressive 1/500 of a second.

The D200 sports a 2.5-inch, 230,000-pixel LCD, a big improvement from the 1.8-inch, 118,000-pixel unit on the D100, and from the 2-inch, 130,000-pixel display on the D70s. Nikon claims a 170-degree angle of view for the D200's display. The D200 offers a USB 2.0 connectivity, a huge improvement over the D100's USB 1.0 link.

The D200 is slated for availability in December, at a retail price of just under $1700.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

What's Your Take?

All Comments
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below