cameras

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-T100 Digital Camera Review

Read a review of the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-T100 point-and-shoot digital camera on DigitalCameraInfo.com

June 18, 2007
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Overall Impressions

**Value ***(6.75)*

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-T100 retails for $399, which is on the high end for an ultra-slim digital camera. The T100 packs in lots of pricy features like a stabilized 5x zoom lens, face detection, high definition output, and a decent burst mode. Other digital cameras with similar features are priced between $349 and $399, so Sony is asking a fair price but there is plenty of competition to look at too.

Comparisons

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-T20 – This digital camera is the baby sister of the T100 with 8.1 megapixels and a shorter 3x optical zoom lens that includes image stabilization. It still has lots of great features though and comes at a cheaper $329 price. The Sony T20 has face detection technology and the ability to output pictures and musical slide shows in high definition. It has the same exposure modes and settings. It has the 9-point auto focus system, VGA video that requires the Memory Stick Duo Pro card, 2.2 fps burst mode, and 9 scene modes. It has the host of retouching filters too. The T20 measures 3.5 x 2.25 x 0.9 inches and weighs 5.5 ounces fully loaded with its 380-shot battery. It comes in black, white, silver, and pink all-metal housings, an optical viewfinder and a 230,000-pixel 2.5-inch LCD.

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Nikon Coolpix S50 – The 7.2-megapixel S50’s 0.8-inch black matte metal body easily slides into a pocket. The automatically oriented digital camera has a portrait button that activates red-eye reduction, face priority, and lighting compensation technology for better pictures of people. It has a shorter 3x optical zoom lens but a larger 3-inch LCD screen. The lens is optically stabilized, which comes in handy in the movie mode. The Nikon Coolpix S50 has the same video resolution at 640 x 480 pixels and can merge its movies into Pictmotion slide shows with music. The Sony T100’s musical slide shows can only be viewed but the Nikon S50’s slide shows can be saved as shows. The Nikon S50’s battery is weaker as it only gets 130 shots per charge. It runs on the more common media format of SD, SDHC, and MMC, and has 13 MB of internal memory as well. The S50 retails for $299.

Canon PowerShot SD850 IS – This model is slightly thicker at 1.04 inches and 5.82 ounces, but it comes with lots of the same draws. The Canon SD850 has 8 megapixels and a 4x optical zoom lens that has an image stabilization system. The camera has a face recognition system that works very quickly and just as well as the Sony version. It has a larger shutter speed range from 15-1/1600th of a second and a variety of apertures starting from a wider f/2.8. The SD850 has 18 scene modes including a new Creative Light Effect mode that changes highlights into heart and star shapes. It has 5 movie modes, My Colors picture effects that are available before recording or in playback, and a stitch assist mode that aids in shooting panoramas. The Canon PowerShot SD850 IS has a 2.5-inch LCD screen and adds an optical viewfinder. The Canon has a slower 1.3 fps burst mode that records to SD, SDHC, and MMC media and costs the same at $399.

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Casio Exilim EX-V7 – This digital camera has less resolution but more zoom in a similarly sized package. The V7 has 7.2 megapixels and a 7x optically stabilized zoom lens at the same $399 price. It measures 2.35 x 3.76 x 1 inches and is 0.82 inches at its thinnest point making it the smallest 7x digital camera. The control setup is quite different on the Casio V7: there is a handy mode dial for quick changes and a vertical switch that controls the zoom rather than the horizontal see-saw control on the Sony T100. This Exilim has a 2.5-inch LCD screen with 230,000 pixels and a tiny flash unit that isn’t very powerful: it only covers 7.2 feet. Still, the flash comes with rapid and soft flash modes. There are 33 scene modes along with manual and priority exposure modes. There are 10 movie modes that record highly compressed video that takes up 1.5x less space on media when recording. The Casio Exilim EX-V7 runs on a 240-shot battery and SD media and comes with all kinds of cool kitschy stuff like a For eBay mode and in-camera scrapbook layouts for direct printing.

s850.jpg
Samsung S850 – This 8.1-megapixel digital camera has a slightly chunkier hand grip but isn’t SLR-shaped at all. It aims for the compact crowd with 3.9 x 2.5 x 1-inch measurements and a retro matte black shell. Its 5x optical zoom lens protrudes from the camera and about 3x of the zoom is functional in the movie mode. Video can be recorded at the standard VGA resolution or at 800 x 592 pixels at 20 fps. The Samsung S850 has 11 scene modes including a Wise Shot mode that snaps with and without the flash and shows the images side-by-side. The S850 has a 2.5-inch LCD screen that displays the confusing menus. If users can find the option, there are unique picture effects such as word bubbles. The burst mode snaps away at 2 fps and the camera has an effective face recognition auto focus system. It runs on 2 AA batteries and comes with a whopping 45MB of internal memory – all for a retail price of $299.

**Who It’s For

***Point-and-Shooters* – This little camera can slip in and out of a pocket and is ready to shoot at a moment’s notice. It isn’t built for lengthy photo sessions but is great for point-and-shooters who want a shot here or there.

Budget Consumers – With a retail price of $399, this digital camera won’t fit into most budgets. The T100 comes with costly features like optical image stabilization, a metal body, face detection, and high definition output.

Gadget Freaks – Freak out. This little Sony has menus like a PlayStation, an LCD almost as big as a television, and cool features like face detection and high definition output.

Manual Control Freaks – The Program Auto mode is as manual as this camera gets, so these users aren’t likely to purchase it.

Pros/ Serious Hobbyists – Without manual control or even a real grip to hang onto, these seasoned photographers will steer clear of the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-T100.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Testing / Performance
  2. Components
  3. Design / Layout
  4. Modes
  5. Control Options
  6. Image Parameters
  7. Connectivity / Extras
  8. Overall Impressions
  9. Conclusion
  10. Sample Photos
  11. Photo Gallery
  12. Specs / Ratings
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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