cameras

Panasonic Lumix FZ70 Digital Camera Review

Panasonic's bridge camera sacrifices performance for an absurd zoom.

November 27, 2013
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Armed with a market-leading 60x zoom and a 16MP 1/2.3 CMOS sensor, the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ70 (MSRP $399.99) looks to capture the interest of those needing shots from far away. Though there's a burgeoning market for longer and longer zooms, the usual tradeoff is a wildly unappealing drop in image quality. That's not to say that this camera is bad by any stretch—but the FZ70's advantage is limited to taking pictures from far away.

The FZ70 would be perfect for whale-watching, birding, or other activity that requires a huge distance between you and your subject. However, that zoom comes at a cost that may sour many on Panasonic's new point-and-shoot. There are a few other options to consider at this price point offering better performance, so be sure to weigh your options before settling on this particular camera.

Design & Handling

On the light side, but very grippy

The design of the FZ70 is solid, and quite a bit lighter than it looks. The grip is deep and well-textured, and the camera won't cause you arm fatigue when shooting for an extended period of time. This should satisfy most novice photographers out there; however, the buttons and materials make you feel somewhat like you're holding a plastic toy—not a $400 camera.

The guts of the camera are fairly pedestrian Tweet It

Controlling the FZ70 is easy for the most part. It's a simple task to switch between shooting modes with the top-mounted mode dial, and toggling common functions like macro mode or changing the informational display is handled with just a quick press of a well-labeled button. Should you want a little more control, you can jump into advanced settings via the rear control cluster.

Though pedestrian, the guts of the camera aren't hindered too much when it comes to capturing acceptably decent photos. While the 60x optical zoom range is mighty impressive, it's held back by an f/2.8-8 multi-stage aperture and a 1/2.3" CMOS sensor. They will get the job done for share-worthy snaps, but for large prints or in low light image quality will take a dip. It'll be tough to get pictures with a good depth of field, and those willing to sacrifice a bit on the zoom range may want to look at the Panasonic FZ200, which has "just" a 24x zoom but has a constant f/2.8 aperture.

If you don't like the included flash, a hot shoe on the top of the camera enables the use of other accessories like a third-party flash. Additionally, the microphone on the top is quite interesting, if a bit perplexing. Because you're never going to use a flash in video, Panasonic placed it atop the pop-up flash assembly. With several casing openings and some foam inserted between the diaphragm element and the outside, wind noise will be far less of a nuisance.

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Features

Well-supported, solid controls

Saying that the DMC-FZ70 is nothing out of the ordinary when it comes to advanced features isn't necessarily a bad thing. Sometimes speed matters more than anything else. If your camera requires you to run through a litany of settings on startup, you might miss your shot—and that's an experience the DMC-FZ70 will not subject you to.

The main draw to this camera is that absolutely insane 20-1200mm equivalent zoom lens. Tweet It

All that considered, the main draw to this camera isn't the build, features, or picture quality: it's that absolutely insane 60x zoom lens. I mean, just look at that monster—it's got a crazy-long focal length, and it's amazing what you can shoot with such a ridiculous zoom. Though the use of polymer lenses sometimes means lower image quality, it's an act of mercy when you consider just how much heavier using glass would be.

Even though it's big, the lens moves quickly—The lens motor on the DMC-FZ70 keeps pace with the one found inside the Canon SX50 HS. You'll never be a step behind, even if you change focal lengths often.

It's also apparent that Panasonic paid a bit of attention to video. Though it's very common on cameras nowadays, the ability to shoot in full 1080p at 30 frames a second in both AVCHD and MP4 formats is a big plus. The combination of several capture options and that huge zoom also makes it a great option for capturing sports. If you want to tweak your videos a bit, there's a dedicated menu to adjust video shooting modes, though this can't be done on the fly.

Performance

In every silver lining, a touch of grey

If you're looking for extremely accurate colors, this camera can hang tough with some of the better DSLRs out there. That's certainly impressive, but it's one shining result in a sea of mediocrity. In practice, the FZ70 leaves a lot to be desired in many areas, and many of its shortcomings can be directly attributed to that monster zoom.

You'll notice a bit of fringing and a higher noise level than you'd expect. Tweet It

Cramming a 60x zoom lens into a camera with a 1/2.3" sensor is not only a problem of packaging, but it also introduces all sorts of image quality problems. For starters, sharpness takes a huge hit in comparison to other cameras with more sensible optics. Additionally, there's noticeable fringing and a higher noise level than you'd expect on a camera this price.

If it's any consolation, the optical stabilization on the FZ70 is actually quite good, and worthy of special mention. Though the feature does lead to some framing issues at longer focal lengths, if you are able to hold your camera absolutely rock-steady you can expect the Panasonic superzoom to mitigate the ill effects of shaky human hands. There's no reason your morning coffee should ruin your shots, so snap away!

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On the other hand, video performance is closer to what we'd term "fair." While the options for changing file formats and sizes are annoying to get to if you're not in manual mode, you'll be able to shoot reasonably sharp cinematics and control zoom during your capture. There's a little bit of trailing here and there, but ultimately nothing worse than you'd expect from a point-and-shoot: the DMC-FZ70 passes the "good enough" test.

Conclusion

Impressive color accuracy, but a flop when it comes to detail.

If it seems like I'm a little tough on this camera, it's because it could have been so much more. Though the "bigger is better" mentality would lead you to believe that the lens on this camera was something to behold, it actually isn't. Despite that enormous focal length, quality suffers greatly, and it's very noticeable.

That's not to say that this type of extended zoom camera doesn't have its upside: If you know someone who plays sports, or has a lot of recitals, this is exactly the type of camera you want when you're stuck in the nosebleeds. Sure, you won't get snaps like you would with a DSLR courtside, but you'll at least be able to get reasonably acceptable shots from ridiculously far away.

If you're looking for an enormous zoom with the performance to match, consider the Canon SX50—though it has "only" a 50x zoom, it has the same maximum focal length, and much better image quality. It can't get as wide a shot as the FZ70 can, but that's not really the reason you buy a superzoom, right? That 60x zoom on the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ70 is the largest we've ever reviewed, but it's a double-edged sword.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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