cameras
  • Editors' Choice

Fujifilm X20 Digital Camera Review

Fujifilm’s X10 followup is more refresh than reboot.

$599.99
http://reviewed-production.s3.amazonaws.com/attachment/c78eb690054aa0de98b97a125069ba15dc88470f/x20hero.jpg
Advertisement

Fujifilm’s been on a roll over the last few years, cranking out cameras that aren’t only classically gorgeous but also photographically gifted. That’s not to say everything’s been perfect; the X100, for example, was plagued with software problems right off the bat. Even though it became a hit for Fuji, early adopters were forced to grin and bear it through teething issues.

Fuji should be complimented for its quick response to those issues and willingness to add significant features through firmware updates, but cameras need solid hardware to take advantage of firmware no matter how refined. And that’s where the Fujifilm X20 (MSRP $599.99) comes into play. Even though it sports some intriguing new features, it’s largely the same as its predecessor in most user-facing ways— the big changes are all under the hood.

Design & Handling

Why mess with a good thing?

fronthandling.jpg
Looks aren't everything. The X20 is a pleasure to use, too.

Even though it’s a compact camera, the X20 isn’t cheap— in terms of price or build quality. Every part of its design screams "premium", and the camera feels more or less worth its $600 price tag. From the sexy metal lens cap to pleasing knurled dials, every detail has been considered. Fujifilm manufactures the X20 in Japan, and the camera proudly bears the mark under its Disp/Back button.

If you yearn for the all-metal cameras of the 60’s and 70’s, when cameras were made predominantly of metal, get ready for a flashback (no, not an acid flashback). The X20 apes the late 20th century's film cameras in all the right ways, using metal for the exterior and a molded plastic for the wrap-around grip. A well-loved copy wouldn't look out of place at a flea market or an antique store. And it's not just about looks,either.

The camera's controls echo the hands-on shooting style of classic rangefinders. Even though you won’t find a knob for shutter speed, or an adjustment for ASA/ISO, there are two control wheels as well as dedicated exposure compensation and mode dials.

qbutton.jpg
This little button is your new best friend.

Late in its life, the X10 received an update that allowed the RAW button to access the Q menu, a neatly arranged way to change most settings. The X20 drops the RAW button entirely and instead has a Q button in its place, making the Q menu easier to discover. Fuji has given this special button a flatter profile, making it easy to find by touch alone, since the surrounding buttons are all domed. That said, because of the considerable array of manual controls at hand, you probably won't find yourself using the menus as much as you would on a competing compact camera like the Sony RX100.

Although we loved the tactile feedback of many of the X20's controls, especially the shutter button, the rear selection wheel was a weak point. It felt terribly unresponsive and you might even be forgiven for thinking it was broken. Ultimately, this flaw undermines the otherwise excellent control scheme. The X10 had the same issue, so it's a little weird to see it hasn't been corrected in the new model.

One final note—the X20 is available in ninja-like black (like the X10), as well as a silver-and-black variant.

Advertisement

Features

Tweaks in the right places

Everything praiseworthy about the X10 remains in the X20. That said, there are some changes to both the software and hardware, mostly as a result of the new 12-megapixel 2/3" sensor. The X20 takes after more recent X-series cameras, utilizing an X-Trans color filter. Fuji says that its X-Trans technology "minimizes generation of both moiré and false colors, eliminating the necessity for an optical low-pass filter." In our testing, we did find that the X20 was sharper than the X10. Moiré wasn't a noticeable issue in still shooting, which was nice to see.

It's nice to see Hybrid AF trickle down to a less expensive Fujifilm.

The most surprising aspect of the new sensor is the addition of new autofocusing technology. The X20 uses both contrast- and phase-detection methods, speeding up focussing quite a bit. While the X10 never felt sluggish, the X20 certainly feels more snappy in real-world usage. This feature was one of the star additions to Fujifilm's X100S, and it's nice to see Hybrid AF trickle down to a camera that's less than half the cost.

Even though it's unchanged from the X10, attention still deserves to be drawn to the X20's excellent 28-112mm equivalent lens. Unlike most compact camera lenses, the X20's zoom action is manually controlled; while that might be a turnoff to those used to power zoom, we appreciated its precision and found it to be more engaging. Twisting the lens brings the X20 to life, and if you keep turning the it you'll quickly go from wide to full telephoto. If you notice a distant subject you want to shoot, you can easily turn the camera on and zoom in one motion. We'd be remiss if we didn't mention how bright this lens is, too. It's f/2-2.8, which is rare to find in a compact zoom camera. We noticed some serious softness when wide open at full telephoto, but that's not uncommon with compact zoom lenses.

cuttingitcloseovf.jpg
The X20's OVF is well-executed, but we think an EVF might be more useful.

Another unique feature of the X20 is its optical viewfinder. It doesn't involve a true rangefinder focusing system, but at least you get around 85% frame coverage. New in the X20 is an LCD overlay, giving users live autofocus, aperture, shutter speed, and mode information. While the LCD overlay was a much-needed addition, the OVF itself remains less than useful. Even though it's executed well, parallax error will throw off your composition every time— and learning to compensate takes practice. Also, part of the frame will be taken up by the extended lens barrel from about 28mm to 50mm, making it even harder to accurately frame subjects. Although we've been skeptical of the quality of electronic viewfinders in the past, they've made great strides in the past few years; equipping the X20 with an EVF similar to one from the X-E1 (or the X-Pro1's hybrid finder) would be a great improvement.

Performance

Poor battery life is still a buzzkill.

Like the X10, the X20 is an above-average performer in its class. Its bright, sharp lens and improved X-Trans sensor make for a powerful combination. We recorded excellent resolution figures throughout the zoom range, acceptable noise performance and color that was pleasing to the eye, if not technically accurate. For one, color wasn't quite as accurate as what we saw from the X10 in late 2011. If you're only concerned with stills output, we can assure you that the X20 is a fine choice.

That is, unless you're planning on shooting all day. Even though the X20 has the same exact battery as the X10, and, even though they're rated for the same number of shots, we found that the X20 seemed to die more quickly. We were often left stranded after just a few hours of sporadic shooting. It doesn't help that the on-screen battery meter seemed to drop from "plenty left" to "ohmygodwhereismycharger" way too quickly. It's a good thing secondary batteries are inexpensive, because you're going to need one. Or two.

DSCF4342.JPG
The X20's great macro modes make for some terrific flower shots.

The X20 feels a lot snappier to use than the X10, in large part because of the new Hybrid AF system. We found that the X20 did a good job locking onto the desired subject. The optical viewfinder's focus confirmation was a great help, too, since the most feedback the X10 granted the user was the illumination of a green autofocus light their peripheral vision—with that OVF, you knew the camera had locked on, but had no idea what was going to be in focus. Macro mode remains a strong point for the X20. You can choose between either regular or super macro settings; choosing the latter option will let you focus on objects that are almost touching the lens, revealing detail you wouldn't see otherwise.

A 1080/60p upgrade is the biggest news on the video front. That's double what the X10 could output, making for fairly smooth video with excellent detail under bright light. Under low light, the X20 lost detail but not significantly. Where we saw the most disappointing video was in our sharpness test. Even though detail was visible in this lab test, the X20 showed some really ugly moiré, transforming our black-and-white test chart into a psychedelic experience. While the X20 doesn't have a microphone jack, Fujifilm is now selling an accessory mic that uses the USB port instead, although given the ugly moiré we saw, we don't exactly think it's a worthwhile investment.

Conclusion

While the competition may be stiffer than ever, the X20 wins on raw charisma.

DSCF4327.JPG
Though it's not perfect, the X20 has plenty of character.

When the X10 was released in 2011, it had a lot of interesting things going for it. Not only did it have second-to-none build quality, it also sported a larger-than-average sensor for a compact camera and impressively bright lens. Since then, compact camera sensors have gotten even bigger. Cameras like the Ricoh GR and Nikon's Coolpix A even have DSLR-sized chips inside. The top fixed-lens camera in the mid-range is undoubtedly the Sony RX100, whose 1-inch sensor is bigger than the X20's 2/3" unit.

But, unless you have a major case of sensor-size envy, the X20 is cheaper, sexier, and has better manual controls to boot. While it can't compete on sheer image quality and it isn't nearly as pocketable as the RX100, the X20 is a more emotionally engaging device—as sentimental as that might sound. It's not be a a product you would buy based on its spec sheet, but rather one that speaks to the head and heart.

The X20's differentiators are numerous and compelling, especially for enthusiasts. The optical viewfinder, while not as useful as it could be, is nice to have on bright days. Compared to poking around the menus of point-and-shoots like Canon's Powershot S110 or the aforementioned RX100, the X20's manual controls make it an involving camera to use. Finally, the X20's manual zoom lens is fast, feels great to use and along with its new sensor, it makes for pleasing images. All of these elements add up to one unique, high-quality offering.

Reviewed.com In Your Inbox

Sign up to get the latest news and reviews via email

Thanks for signing up!

News and Features

Shootout hero

The Mirrorless 4K Showdown: Sony A7S Vs. Panasonic GH4

The Panasonic GH4 and Sony A7S are great, but which shoots better 4K?

Wg 30w hero

Ricoh Unveils the WG30W Point and Shoot

Want WiFi with that? Ricoh's new toughcam comes with wireless photo sharing.

Panasonic lumix gm5 sample hero

Sample Gallery: Panasonic Lumix GM5

Sample gallery taken with the Panasonic Lumix GM5.

Olympus 40 150 hero 350

Sample Gallery: Olympus M.Zuiko 40–150mm Pro Lens

We spent a weekend with Olympus's 40–150mm f/2.8 lens and fell in love.

Hero

Interview: Sigma CEO Kazuto Yamaki Talks Company's Design Philosophy

We sit down with Sigma's CEO and owner for an exclusive interview at Photokina 2014.

Xt1silverhero

Fujifilm's X-T1 Looks Stunning in Silver

Our favorite X gets an impressive new color.

Genericpentaxhero

Ricoh Confirms Development of Full-Frame Pentax DSLR

Could this be the news Pentaxians have been waiting for?

Olympus 40 150mm hero

Hands-on: The New Olympus 40–150mm f/2.8 Lens

Olympus brings a lightweight zoom with heavyweight results.

Leica lens hero

Leica Complements New Cameras With Lenses, Bags

The Leica T system gets a much-needed booster pack of glass.