cameras
  • Best of Year 2016
  • Editors' Choice

Fujifilm X-Pro2 Digital Camera Review

The X-Pro2: The ultimate photographer's camera

Credit: Reviewed.com / Kyle Looney
February 26, 2016
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

By the Numbers

The X-Pro2 was one of the best cameras we've had in our lab to date. It basically aced every test we could throw at it–with the exception of video. With excellent performance and beautiful aesthetics, the X-Pro2 is a dream camera for many photographers.

Color and White Balance

Fujifilm is adored by many fans because of its ability to emulate its film styles with its digital cameras. The X-Pro2 is no exception, offering a wide variety of color modes such as PROVIA (standard), ASTIA (soft), and Velvia (vivid). However, if you're looking for the most accurate color mode, PRO Neg.Hi is going to be your go-to, with a ∆C 00 (saturation corrected) error of 2.0 and an overall saturation of 95.1%.

X-Pro2 Color Result
Pro Negative Hi turned out to be the most accurate color mode.

White balance is fairly average with the X-Pro2 struggling slightly with fluorescent and incandescent, but nearly perfect in daylight. This is par for the course on most cameras, so if you really want good color accuracy, try sticking with custom white balance settings or shooting in RAW.

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

Resolution

Sharp images is a place that X-Trans sensors are meant to excel in and the X-Pro2 doesn't disappoint. The results of our resolution tests show the X=Pro2 averaging right around 2800 line widths per picture height, a great result. The 35mm f/2 lens that we tested with was consistent across the frame, never dropping below 2000 LW/PH and maxing out around 3400 LW/PH. Those results really show in the final images.

Noise

Noise was another test that the X-Pro2 simply crushed. We were able to shoot through the entire base ISO range (200-12,800) without ever approaching a place where we thought the images were unsuitable for print. With a fast lens, like the 35mm f/2 that we tested the X-Pro2 with, you should have no issues shooting in low light environments. However, if you decide to go above the base ISO with the ISO 25,600 and ISO 51,200 boosts, your milage may vary.

Fujifilm X-Pro2 Rosie Crops
This chart shows the noise progression as the X-Pro2 increases ISO levels.

Video

Video has been the nemesis for the X-Trans sensor since it was first developed. Almost every Fujifilm camera that's used it has been plagued with horrible video quality that is usually accompanied by discoloration and moire. While the X-Pro2 hasn't completely shrugged these issues, it has come a long way in the battle against them.

Despite that, the X-Pro2 still turned in sharp video at 1080/60p with around 600 lp/ph horizontally and 650 lp/ph vertically in bright light conditions. Dropping down to 60 lux, we saw the sharpness take a slight hit, topping out at 575 lp/ph horizontally and 625 lp/ph vertically. The X-Pro2 also only required 2 lux to produce an image at 50 IRE, our minimum acceptable picture standard.

X-Pro2 Video Screengrab
The video still produces discoloration, but not as bad as most X-Trans sensors.

If you look at the image above, you'll see some slight color issues at high frequencies, but trust me, it's nothing compared to the blobs of color that previous Fujifilm cameras have produced. We realize that it still isn't great, but it's a huge step in the right direction and hopefully the next few Fuji cameras can finally take this issue down.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Compare Prices
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

What's Your Take?

All Comments